metal clay, copper clay, bronze clay, silver clay, art clay, steel clay, gold clay
FAQ HomeFAQAsk us a QuestionSave your Favorites
Metal Clay Academy Excellence in Art Clay and Precious Metal Clay PMC
Search Advanced Search
Categories
Beginners (49)
Advanced (14)
Glass (2)
Hollow Forms (1)
Patina and Colours (8)
Stones (8)
Technical (30)
Training (2)
Firing (9)
Finishing (10)
Business (3)
Money saving tips (3)
Search
Advanced Search
FAQs
Search our FAQ to find resolutions to common issues.

 

Favorites
My stone seems to lose its depth and lustre when I put it in a bezel, can I improve the look?
Some stones and also glass cabochons can benefit from having a coloured backing put into the bezel before setting the stone. Opals are particularly good with dark grit emery paper behind them.
How do I use metal clay with bisque beads?
Painting bisque beads with slip can produce some wonderful results.
How thick should my clay be?
This depends on what you are making, how deep the texture you're using is, if you're putting texture on the back and the front and also to some extent personal taste. If you're making a pair of small plain earrings, you can roll the clay out to three cards thick. This should make a light pair of earrings that are strong enough to withstand the wear. If you're using deep texture you should go up to five or six cards thick. Deep texture on the back and front of a piece may require your initial rolling to be even thicker. If your piece is going to get lots of wear, like a pendant with a wrap over bail, the bail part should be a little thicker so it can withstand the wear. You will probably know if you've gone too thin when you try to pick the piece up.
What is a CZ?
A hard and relatively inexpensive synthetic stone, created in laboratories and often cut to resemble a diamond. It is available in a variety of colours and different shapes.
How can I get a good brass brush effect on very small pieces?
You can buy very small brushes which get into small spaces. Very small burnishing tools also work well to close the pores of the surface of the silver.
What is slip?
Slip is a watered down version of metal clay. You can buy slip or paste directly from the suppliers or make your own by adding water to a small lump of clay, filings or dried out clay. Slip can be used to attach two pieces of metal clay together, fill in small cracks or painted onto leaves, flowers, pods etc to make unique designs.
What are the working stages of metal clay?
There are three working stages; lump clay, leather hard or green stage and fired.
What are the problems associated with quenching hot metal clay?
If you want to refire, enamel or solder on a piece of metal clay that has been quenched, you may find that moisture has got trapped in the metal. When you heat it again, especially if you heat it fast, the moisture turns to steam and may cause a blister on the surface. You need to dry the piece thoroughly if you have quenched the metal following the initial firing.It is also important to remember that you should not quench a piece which has glass or stones as part of the design. The sudden change in temperature from the firing to the cold water may cause shock and the stone or glass could be damaged or break entirely. Leave your piece to air cool, it should only take a few minutes.
My clay is dry, powdery, flaky and cracking. What can I do?
Spritz or brush the clay with water, wrap it in clingfilm/Saran Wrap and squish the water into the clay. Then leave it for a while. The clay will absorb the water and become usable again. If itís too sticky, leave it open to the air for a short while.

Pages 1 2 3 4 Next