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What are the ingredients of Badger Balm?

Badger Balm is often recommended as a lubricant for your hands, work surfaces and tools to stop metal clay sticking.  This is the list of ingredients used in the Badger Balm products taken from their website.

  • Rich Oils (organic extra virgin olive oil, organic coconut oil, etc.)
  • Essential Oils & Extracts (organic rosemary, organic ginger, organic peppermint, etc.)
  • Butters (Wild African shea butter & Fair Trade cocoa butter)
  • Beeswax – will be certified organic by August 2008
  • Minerals (zinc oxide and pumice) & Alkali (sodium hydroxide – to make soap from oil)
  • Nothing else. We use no preservatives, no emulsifiers, no colors, nothing derived from petroleum and nothing synthetic, toxic, harmful or controversial.

Visit the Badger Balm website here


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Article ID: 10038 Article Created: 06-11-2008 11:38 AM

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