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Search our FAQ to find resolutions to common issues.
Which training course should I choose?

This is a difficult question to answer quickly. There are many training providers throughout the UK, many of which have not had any formal training to train others. This doesn’t mean they’re bad teachers though. There are lots of very good teachers who have been working with metal clay for many years and have a wealth of knowledge to pass on to students. 

The best place to start if you’re looking for a teacher is to think about what you want to do with metal clay. Consider the following questions…

Do you want to dip your toe in the water and see if you like working with metal clay? If so look for a teacher who offers taster sessions of maybe a few hours or half a day. By choosing a short taster you can find out if you like working with metal clay and also find out if you like the teachers training style.

Do you want to jump right in and learn as much as possible in a weekend?

There are lots of teachers offering weekend beginners courses. Have a look at our metal clay training page to see what’s available in your area.

Do you want to do a recognised certification or diploma training course?

There are several ways of doing this; Art Clay Certification, PMC Certification or the Diploma in Silver Metal Clay. Each of these courses have specific merits so read these pages to find out the one that’s right for you.

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Article ID: 10043 Article Created: 06-11-2008 12:04 PM

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