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Search our FAQ to find resolutions to common issues.
How can I keep the patina on my jewellery?

Anything you put on top of a patina in order to preserve it will
change the way the light reflects off the silver. So it's a bit of a
tradeoff. Some people don't like the change in reflectivity, others
don't mind at all.

If the patina is only in recessed areas, you should be able to rub the
surface of the silver lightly with a jewelry polishing cloth without
removing the patina in the recessed areas if you are careful. If it's
on the surface of the piece, the patina will change over time if you
don't coat it. (Patina is essentially a controlled form of tarnish, so
by definition any patina is at a particular point in its evolutionary
cycle, so to speak, at the time you apply it.) Protecting it against
light, moisture, salt, and both acid and alkali, including
perspiration, will help preserve the color longer.

Some people swear by Nikolas 2105 Spray Lacquer in Clear, which is
available online from Votaw Tool Company (www.votawtool.com).

Thanks to Margaret Schindel for this tip. Visit Margaret's excellent Squidoo metal clay site here


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Article ID: 10065 Article Created: 07-05-2008 14:56 PM

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