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How do I find out where to put the holes on a pendant to make it balance right?

Here is a quickie solution to finding the balance of a pendant, symmetrical or asymmetrical.
 
Have some copper wire, craft wire and some polymer clay handy.
 
When the pendant is in the greenware stage and you have it totally finished. No more sanding, adding, carving or using a damp cosmetic sponge.  Really dry.
 
Make a simple loop of the wire. Have just one end sticking out. Drill a small hole 1/3 of the way down from the top in the back of the pendant. You do have to have somewhat of an idea of the directionality of the work.
 
Working over a soft surface, bubble wrap, layers of cloth bend a 90 degree in the end of the wire and stick it in the hole you made in the back of the pendant.  Since it is just one hole, gravity will decide which direction your bail Will be put. 
 
If you do not like the way it hangs, make a new hole and try again. It will only take a minute to fill those holes back up and the resulting look of the whole jewelry piece will make the time  so worthwhile.
 
Oh, the loop in the wire is for ease of handling.

And, the polymer clay is for those who change their mind after the work is fired.  Make a loop with the pc and smash the ends on the back. Use your wire end, as a substitute chain to see how the piece will hang. If the piece is too heavy it might not work. If that is the case, drill holes and test how it hangs and then re-fire with the holes filled and the new bail in place.

Lorrene Davis


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Article ID: 10076 Article Created: 11-05-2008 09:53 AM

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